Book Reviews

CEJISS welcomes academics, students and the interested public to contribute to our growing book review section. Please select a book of your interest from the list of available books below, complete the electronic form and submit it to the CEJISS administration. As soon as we receive your request, our staff will contact you and forward you your book selection -- free of charge -- on condition that you submit a book review within two months of receiving the book. Please read our Author's Guide for additional information. Additionally, CEJISS welcomes book reviews for books not listed below, though please contact the CEJISS Review Editor, Ms. Adisa Avdic (avdic@cejiss.org) to ensure your selected book corresponds with the themes covered by CEJISS.

Cyber Policy in China

Book review

Wonhee Lee

Cyber Policy in China

Greg Austin’s Cyber Policy in China provides an extensive and illuminating survey of China’s quest, since the year 2000, for informatisation—the process by which China is transforming itself into an advanced information society. With his chronological analysis, Austin neatly interweaves nearly 1,000 sources from China and the US, focusing on the interplay between ‘ideal policy values’ in China’s informatisation ambition and ‘leadership values’— such as regime stability, economic nationalism and…

Gridlock: Why Global Cooperation is Failing When We Need It Most

Book review

Diletta Fabiani

Gridlock: Why Global Cooperation is Failing When We Need It Most

In Gridlock: Why Global Cooperation is Failing When We Need It Most, authors Thomas Dale, David Held and Kevin Young ask: Why are international negotiations increasingly stalling at a time when we desperately need them to efficiently tackle current global issues? According to the authors, international institutions are failing because they are in a state of ‘gridlock’—the concept defined as a ‘specific set of conditions and mechanisms that impede global cooperation in the present day’ (p. 3),…

Drone Warfare

Book review

Daniel Connolly

Drone Warfare

Philosopher John Kaag and political scientist Sarah Kreps share the concern that drone technology is developing faster than our ability to understand its implications. The result of their collaboration, Drone Warfare (2014, Polity Press) is an interdisciplinary synthesis of the legal, political and moral arguments surrounding the United States’ use of armed drones to conduct targeted killings of suspected terrorists. Their treatment of US drone policy, while largely critical, is nevertheless…

What’s Wrong with the WTO and How to Fix It

Book review

Unislawa Williams and LaDarrien Gillette

What’s Wrong with the WTO and How to Fix It

What’s Wrong with the WTO and How to Fix It by Rorden Wilkinson is not only a bold analysis of the failures of the World Trade Organization (WTO), but also a proposal for how to fundamentally reform it. According to Wilkinson, the primary goal of a reorganised WTO should be to improve humanitarian outcomes—not to increase and encourage free trade. If the aim continues to be on expanding free trade, with the expectation that humanitarian outcomes may follow, the system will continue to…

Sexual Violence and Armed Conflict

Book review

Veronika Váchalová

Sexual Violence and Armed Conflict

Sexual violence has a history as long as the practise of war itself. It has been a part of the spoils of war that represent the gravest abuses of human rights. Nowadays, despite enormous humanitarian protests and efforts it is continuously used as a prevalent war tactic and a tool of war. Janie L. Leatherman looks at the causes and consequences of sexual violence in armed conflicts. Her book Sexual Violence in Armed Conflict is timely. She creates a link between global political economic…

Social Movements in Global Politics

Book review

Aliaksandr Novikau

Social Movements in Global Politics

The twenty-first century has, so far, been characterised by a crisis of institutional politics. Nation-state governments have become less and less capable of solving long-standing, potentially catastrophic problems such as global climate change, world population growth, global inequality and the loss of local cultures. As a result, many people are dissatisfied with politicians and politics in general. According to West, author of Social Movements in Global Politics, these flaws in policy-making…

Is the EU doomed?

Book review

Daniela Lenčéš Chalániová

Is the EU doomed?

n recent years, Polity Press released a number of works which take issue with the current crisis of the EU and the possible futures that might follow from it. Consider, for instance, Simon Hix’s What’s Wrong with the EU & How to Fix It (2008), Jürgen Habermas’ essay collection The Crisis of the European Union: A Response (2012) and Anthony Giddens’ Turbulent and Mighty Continent: What Future for Europe? (2013).  Zielonka’s book-long essay Is the EU Doomed? fits neatly into this body of…

Human Rights: An Interdisciplinary Approach

Book review

Teodora-Maria Daghie

Human Rights: An Interdisciplinary Approach

Human rights are considered universal, meaning that they should be applied regardless of any borders, ethnicity, skin colour, sex, language, religion, sexual orientation, political opinion or social status (etc). They also state that all people are born free and equal in dignity and have equal rights. At the global level we have achieved a Universal Declaration of Human Rights and various UN conventions, including those dealing with genocide, discrimination and gender rights. Freeman’s work…

Politics in the Age of Austerity

Book review

Jan Kovář

Politics in the Age of Austerity

  Democratic-capitalist governments are increasingly facing restraints as they endeavour to reconcile the conflicting interests and demands on public policy of two competing constituencies: the people and “markets.” The fiscal crisis and the resulting rise of the austerity state further deepen these dilemmas. But, what is the impact of the rise of the austerity state and deteriorating public finances on democracy and political participation? Will democracy be able to continue to promote…

European Union Foreign Policy in a Changing World

Book review

Andriy Tyushka

European Union Foreign Policy in a Changing World

The flurry of changes to the EU’s internal and external environments produced a demand for thorough analytical accounts of the Union’s challenges as an international actor aiming to imprint the world order. Unsurprisingly, a robust scholarship of EU foreign policy analysis has mushroomed in the last decade. Among them, Karen E. Smith’s European Union Foreign Policy in a Changing World stands out for its distinctive focus—searching for the rationale behind the EU’s empowerment and its goal…

2017 - Volume 11, Issue 4